Mon, 13 Apr 2015 19:12
saltmanz's review: "I'm a big fan of Peter Clines' Ex-Heroes books, so when I saw he had a new thriller out, I jumped at the chance to get my hands on a review copy. I generally like to go into a book knowing as little about it as possible, and in this case I didn't even read the back-cover synopsis, so I was practically jumping in blind—Clines' name on the cover was enough to get me excited. And my enthusiasm was amply rewarded. The Fold starts out at a slow burn. We meet our protagonist, Leland "Mike" Erikson, who has a genius-level IQ and an eidetic memory, but prefers life under the radar, teaching English at the local high school. But he gets a call from Reggie, an old friend at the Department of Defense, who persuades him to fly out and use his special skills to observe a certain government-funded project. Reggie won't tell Mike what the project is, but it works, and it's amazing—but the project team appears to be stalling for more time and funding. Mike's job is to make sure everything at the project is on the level, so Reggie can push the funding through. But of course, things at the "Albuquerque Door" project aren't entirely what they seem... The first half of the book takes its time setting things up: Mike flies out, meets the team, and gets to see the project's success first-hand. He also spends a lot of time getting to know the individual team members and poring over the project's logs and records. It reminded me a lot of a good Michael Crichton science thriller, with a lot of talking and science-y stuff, and only the occasional shock thrown out to deepen the mystery. This goes on for the first half of the book, but the pace never flags: Clines keeps the tension high and the slowly-unfolding mystery intriguing. The short chapter-length and crisp prose work wonders, too. At about the halfway point, though, the Big Reveal hits and things start to unravel (in a good way!) at an accelerated pace, with the final act (after the Bigger Reveal) just going completely off the rails. It's nuts. Maybe a little too nuts. But it's frigging compelling reading. I read the whole thing in 24 hours: the first quarter Friday night (late Friday night), the second quarter Saturday morning. By Saturday afternoon, I couldn't stand it anymore, and plopped down and cranked through the second half in a single sitting. I just could not put it down. As I said previously, I'm not big on spoilers myself, and I also like to keep my reviews fairly tight-lipped when it comes to plot. But I mentioned Crichton earlier, and somewhere around a third of the way in I was very heavily reminded of his novel Timeline. If you took some of the concepts from that book and mashed them up with Patrick Lee's The Breach trilogy (read that if you haven't already, seriously) you'd get something very much like The Fold. If I had to quibble, I'd say that the main premise (cool as it is) probably doesn't hold up to much scrutiny (or if it does, there are a lot of coincidences going on) and that, despite Mike Erikson's memory and intellect, I was able to arrive at a number of correct conclusions long before he did. And the end certainly does get weird. But really this book was just so much fun that I can barely bring myself to voice the complaints themselves, let alone delve into them. It's just that good. And according to the afterword, it's also tangentially-related to an earlier Clines book called 14. Shoot, looks like I've got a book to track down... [4 out of 5 stars]"
Category: LibraryThing   [ x ]
Mon, 13 Apr 2015 19:12
saltmanz's review: "I'm a big fan of Peter Clines' Ex-Heroes books, so when I saw he had a new thriller out, I jumped at the chance to get my hands on a review copy. I generally like to go into a book knowing as little about it as possible, and in this case I didn't even read the back-cover synopsis, so I was practically jumping in blind—Clines' name on the cover was enough to get me excited. And my enthusiasm was amply rewarded. The Fold starts out at a slow burn. We meet our protagonist, Leland "Mike" Erikson, who has a genius-level IQ and an eidetic memory, but prefers life under the radar, teaching English at the local high school. But he gets a call from Reggie, an old friend at the Department of Defense, who persuades him to fly out and use his special skills to observe a certain government-funded project. Reggie won't tell Mike what the project is, but it works, and it's amazing—but the project team appears to be stalling for more time and funding. Mike's job is to make sure everything at the project is on the level, so Reggie can push the funding through. But of course, things at the "Albuquerque Door" project aren't entirely what they seem... The first half of the book takes its time setting things up: Mike flies out, meets the team, and gets to see the project's success first-hand. He also spends a lot of time getting to know the individual team members and poring over the project's logs and records. It reminded me a lot of a good Michael Crichton science thriller, with a lot of talking and science-y stuff, and only the occasional shock thrown out to deepen the mystery. This goes on for the first half of the book, but the pace never flags: Clines keeps the tension high and the slowly-unfolding mystery intriguing. The short chapter-length and crisp prose work wonders, too. At about the halfway point, though, the Big Reveal hits and things start to unravel (in a good way!) at an accelerated pace, with the final act (after the Bigger Reveal) just going completely off the rails. It's nuts. Maybe a little too nuts. But it's frigging compelling reading. I read the whole thing in 24 hours: the first quarter Friday night (late Friday night), the second quarter Saturday morning. By Saturday afternoon, I couldn't stand it anymore, and plopped down and cranked through the second half in a single sitting. I just could not put it down. As I said previously, I'm not big on spoilers myself, and I also like to keep my reviews fairly tight-lipped when it comes to plot. But I mentioned Crichton earlier, and somewhere around a third of the way in I was very heavily reminded of his novel Timeline. If you took some of the concepts from that book and mashed them up with Patrick Lee's The Breach trilogy (read that if you haven't already, seriously) you'd get something very much like The Fold. If I had to quibble, I'd say that the main premise (cool as it is) probably doesn't hold up to much scrutiny (or if it does, there are a lot of coincidences going on) and that, despite Mike Erikson's memory and intellect, I was able to arrive at a number of correct conclusions long before he did. And the end certainly does get weird. But really this book was just so much fun that I can barely bring myself to voice the complaints themselves, let alone delve into them. It's just that good. And according to the afterword, it's also tangentially-related to an earlier Clines book called 14. Shoot, looks like I've got a book to track down... [4 out of 5 stars]"
Category: LibraryThing   [ x ]
Thu, 09 Apr 2015 14:10
saltmanz's review: "Dead Boys is a book I would have never picked up on my own. I'd never heard of it, nor its author, and a quick glance tells me it probably isn't my sort of thing. But out of the blue one day I got an email from the publisher, saying there were review copies available, so I figured I'd go ahead and take a chance. By the next day, I had it loaded up on my Kindle and dove in. I initially figured it was a book about zombies. I haven't really consumed a lot of zombie media, so I don't really know if I truly dislike it, but at the same time I have absolutely no desire to really try out the genre. But this book isn't actually about the undead. It's about the dead dead. Dead Boys is a very surreal look at the afterlife, where the dead wash up on the shores of the River Lethe having lost the memories of their prior experiences in the living world. The zombie parallels begin and end with the dead's physical forms: their bodies are in a constant state of decomposition, senses are dulled, and movement is slow and time-consuming. But the dead are always conscious, aware—essentially immortal in their new mode of existence. Squailia put in a lot of effort constructing the ground rules for the post-death life, and then spends the bulk of the book pushing that groundwork out to its logical conclusions. Our main protagonist is Jacob Campbell, ten years a corpse, who's on a quest to return to the living world. In death, Jacob is a well-regarded "preservationist". In Dead City, the sight of bone is abhorrent, and as the dead's physical forms are constantly decaying, Jacob and other specialists like him perform the services of keeping a body lifelike: filling deflated body cavities, replacing worn away flesh and skin with wood and leather, and similar cosmetic modifications. Jacob quickly picks up a handful of fellow travelers (the titular "Dead Boys") and the quest begins in earnest: they must find the Living Man, rumored to have gained entrance to the Land of the Dead without having died himself, and who (Jacob hopes) holds the key to returning to the Land of the Living. That is, of course, just the beginning of their travels. Revelations await, and before anyone can regain the life they once lost, they must first come to fully embrace their new state of existence. I definitely enjoyed Dead Boys. It's not a particularly long book, and I read it in about a week. Jacob is an enjoyable protagonist, but is upstaged by almost all of the secondary characters, which is fine. It adheres very closely to the classic quest formula (travel to Place A, meet character B, travel to place C, meet D, etc...) of which I'm not a huge fan, and the plot stalls out for a bit in the second section, but overall it moves along at a nice clip. Some of the more surreal elements (of which there are a number) felt a little goofy to me, but there was a lot of neat stuff mixed in as well. In the end, I think my expectations were a little off; I would have preferred a slightly deeper, more thoughtful or insightful novel. This book does have some good emotional beats, and obvious care was put into the characters and worldbuilding, but in the end it's a fantasy quest story with a unique and interesting setting. Certainly there are a lot of readers out there who'll fall in love with it. It's by no means brilliant, but I enjoyed it, and I'm glad I took a chance on it. [3.5 out of 5 stars]"
Category: LibraryThing   [ x ]
Thu, 09 Apr 2015 14:10
saltmanz's review: "Dead Boys is a book I would have never picked up on my own. I'd never heard of it, nor its author, and a quick glance tells me it probably isn't my sort of thing. But out of the blue one day I got an email from the publisher, saying there were review copies available, so I figured I'd go ahead and take a chance. By the next day, I had it loaded up on my Kindle and dove in. I initially figured it was a book about zombies. I haven't really consumed a lot of zombie media, so I don't really know if I truly dislike it, but at the same time I have absolutely no desire to really try out the genre. But this book isn't actually about the undead. It's about the dead dead. Dead Boys is a very surreal look at the afterlife, where the dead wash up on the shores of the River Lethe having lost the memories of their prior experiences in the living world. The zombie parallels begin and end with the dead's physical forms: their bodies are in a constant state of decomposition, senses are dulled, and movement is slow and time-consuming. But the dead are always conscious, aware—essentially immortal in their new mode of existence. Squailia put in a lot of effort constructing the ground rules for the post-death life, and then spends the bulk of the book pushing that groundwork out to its logical conclusions. Our main protagonist is Jacob Campbell, ten years a corpse, who's on a quest to return to the living world. In death, Jacob is a well-regarded "preservationist". In Dead City, the sight of bone is abhorrent, and as the dead's physical forms are constantly decaying, Jacob and other specialists like him perform the services of keeping a body lifelike: filling deflated body cavities, replacing worn away flesh and skin with wood and leather, and similar cosmetic modifications. Jacob quickly picks up a handful of fellow travelers (the titular "Dead Boys") and the quest begins in earnest: they must find the Living Man, rumored to have gained entrance to the Land of the Dead without having died himself, and who (Jacob hopes) holds the key to returning to the Land of the Living. That is, of course, just the beginning of their travels. Revelations await, and before anyone can regain the life they once lost, they must first come to fully embrace their new state of existence. I definitely enjoyed Dead Boys. It's not a particularly long book, and I read it in about a week. Jacob is an enjoyable protagonist, but is upstaged by almost all of the secondary characters, which is fine. It adheres very closely to the classic quest formula (travel to Place A, meet character B, travel to place C, meet D, etc...) of which I'm not a huge fan, and the plot stalls out for a bit in the second section, but overall it moves along at a nice clip. Some of the more surreal elements (of which there are a number) felt a little goofy to me, but there was a lot of neat stuff mixed in as well. In the end, I think my expectations were a little off; I would have preferred a slightly deeper, more thoughtful or insightful novel. This book does have some good emotional beats, and obvious care was put into the characters and worldbuilding, but in the end it's a fantasy quest story with a unique and interesting setting. Certainly there are a lot of readers out there who'll fall in love with it. It's by no means brilliant, but I enjoyed it, and I'm glad I took a chance on it. [3.5 out of 5 stars]"
Category: LibraryThing   [ x ]
Fri, 03 Apr 2015 17:21
saltmanz's review: "Before Dark Intelligence, I had read precisely one story by Neal Asher: It was called "Shell Game" and was also set in Asher's "Polity" universe—and I read it 6 years ago and remember nothing about it save that I enjoyed it. Over the years I've seen the announcement of numerous new Polity books, but never got around to picking one up, so when the publisher offered a copy of DA for review I jumped at the chance to finally dig deeper into the universe. Dark Intelligence more or less follows two characters as they chase after a rogue artificial intelligence "black AI" named Penny Royal. First we meet former soldier Thorvald Spear—whose terrific name might be the best thing in the book (not even kidding)—as he awakens 100 years after his death, a feat made possible using recovered memory implants placed into cloned bodies. Spear returns dead-set on revenge against Penny Royal, whom he blames for the death of his squadmates back during the Prador Wars. But is Penny Royal truly to blame? And are Spear's memories even trustworthy? Spear's sections of the book are written in an engaging first-person, often jumping to flashbacks of his memories to give his background, and overall his POV does a good job of getting the reader up to speed with the Polity universe. So it's a surprise when, a few chapters in, we cut from Spear's first-person narrative to a more traditional third-person one. Because this isn't just Thorvald Spear's story. Enter Isobel Santomi, who turns out to be the second protagonist of the novel. She's a crime lord who once struck a deal with Penny Royal, the result of which made her a powerful figure in the underworld. But Penny Royal's gifts always come with a price, and Isobel finds herself slowly transforming into a "hooder", some kind of bizarre, carnivorous wormlike monster. Like Spear, she too desires vengeance on the black AI. Much of the story consists of Spear and Santomi bouncing around chasing Penny Royal from world to world. Thorvald and Isobel cross paths early on, and then Penny Royal hijacks Isobel's ship, with Spear just missing the black AI at each stop. (I'll confess I got a little lost at this point, trying to keep track of who was where as they all bounced around.) Eventually, all the threads converge at the planet Masada for a big finale where everything gets wrapped up nicely. First, the good stuff: This a really cool universe. Thorvald Spear is a great name, as well as a joy to follow around. Penny Royal is a terrifying baddie. Isobel's transformation is well-done body horror of the most disturbing degree. And it's nice to see all the plot threads get tied up by book's end. On the other hand, the promotional material that came with my book billed it as "an ideal entry point for new readers" into the Polity universe (which was fairly influential in my decision to accept a review copy.) But a lot of the stuff at the end of the book seemed to hinge on characters and events from earlier books—with one prominent creature having already had an entire novel dedicated to it—and if I wasn't entirely lost, I feel like I missed out on a lot of the impact the end of book could have had. And speaking of the end: Story-wise, everything came to a nice tidy conclusion, and yet this is just the first book of what I assume is a trilogy. Having said that, though everything was resolved, very little was actually explained, which is where I'm figuring (hoping) Book Two comes in. Make no mistake, though, Dark Intelligence is a good read: fun characters and great action, all set in a fascinating and highly-imaginative (and slightly horrifying) universe. I definitely need to read some more Polity stories, but I'm thinking I'll want to pick up some of the older books first. [3.5 out of 5 stars]"
Category: LibraryThing   [ x ]